PERCEPTIONS AND EFFECTIVENESS OF BEING A NON-NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKER TEACHER (NNEST) AS A FOREIGNER IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

BASTUG, Harun (2010) PERCEPTIONS AND EFFECTIVENESS OF BEING A NON-NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKER TEACHER (NNEST) AS A FOREIGNER IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA. Masters thesis, International Burch University.

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Abstract

In the field of English language teaching (ELT), a growing number of teachers are not native speakers of English. According to current estimates, about eighty percent of English teachers worldwide are non-native speakers of the language. The term non-native English speaking teacher (NNEST) has created a division among professionals in the ELT profession. English is taught commonly in many countries where English is spoken as a second language or spoken widely. Therefore, being a non-native English speaking teacher in your own country, where English is the target language between you and your own local learners and inevitably your mother tongue is used partly during the classes, is different from in a foreign country where English is mutual language between you and your learners. In that case, English is the only way for you and your learners in order to communicate in every part of school life, in school activities or even in your daily life. Learners feel like talking just the target language before, during, and after the classes unavoidably. We can see the differences of learning English through a local non-native English speaking teacher. Key words: English language teaching, NNEST

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PE English
Divisions: Education Faculty > English Language and Literature Department
Depositing User: Selma Omeragic
Date Deposited: 14 Mar 2012 13:53
Last Modified: 14 Mar 2012 13:53
URI: http://eprints.ibu.edu.ba/id/eprint/747

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